A close analysis of act 3 scene 2 1 47 from shakespeares hamlet

Act I[ edit ] The play opens amidst thunder and lightning, and the Three Witches decide that their next meeting shall be with Macbeth. In the following scene, a wounded sergeant reports to King Duncan of Scotland that his generals Macbeth, who is the Thane of Glamis, and Banquo have just defeated the allied forces of Norway and Ireland, who were led by the traitorous Macdonwald, and the Thane of Cawdor.

A close analysis of act 3 scene 2 1 47 from shakespeares hamlet

For Hamlet and the trifling of his favour, Hold it a fashion and a toy in blood, A violet in the youth of primy nature, Forward, not permanent, sweet, not lasting, The perfume and suppliance of a minute; No more.

Perhaps he loves you now, And now no soil nor cautel doth besmirch The virtue of his will: He may not, as unvalued persons do, Carve for himself; for on his choice depends The safety and health of this whole state; And therefore must his choice be circumscribed Unto the voice and yielding of that body Whereof he is the head.

Then if he says he loves you, It fits your wisdom so far to believe it As he in his particular act and place May give his saying deed; which is no further Than the main voice of Denmark goes withal. One cannot help but draw a parallel here to the modern British monarchy and all of the unhappiness and tragedy that ensued because Prince Charles had to marry Diana, deemed most appropriate to be the consort of a future king, and not the love of his life, Camilla Parker-Bowles.

Then weigh what loss your honour may sustain, If with too credent ear you list his songs, Or lose your heart, or your chaste treasure open To his unmaster'd importunity. Fear it, Ophelia, fear it, my dear sister, And keep you in the rear of your affection, Out of the shot and danger of desire.

A close analysis of act 3 scene 2 1 47 from shakespeares hamlet

That the double standard has a long history is evident here. The chariest maid is prodigal enough, If she unmask her beauty to the moon: Virtue itself 'scapes not calumnious strokes: The canker galls the infants of the spring, Too oft before their buttons be disclosed, And in the morn and liquid dew of youth Contagious blastments are most imminent.

Be wary then; best safety lies in fear: Youth to itself rebels, though none else near. Even the most innocent can be defamed, and nature shows, through the metaphor of the canker, that the youngest and most promising can be destroyed before they reach maturity. I shall the effect of this good lesson keep, As watchman to my heart.

But, good my brother, Do not, as some ungracious pastors do, Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven; Whiles, like a puff'd and reckless libertine, Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads, And recks not his own rede. It sounds here as if Ophelia knows her brother rather well, warning him to follow his own advice about modesty and not be a hypocrite.

Her comments also reflect a keen awareness of a double standard that survives even to this day. I stay too long: It sounds as if Laertes is not interested in being dawn into a discussion about his own behaviour, as he suddenly decides it is time to leave.

A double blessing is a double grace, Occasion smiles upon a second leave. While it contains much wise counsel, there is, as we shall see, a bit of a problem with it: The wind sits in the shoulder of your sail, And you are stay'd for.

A close analysis of act 3 scene 2 1 47 from shakespeares hamlet

There; my blessing with thee! And these few precepts in thy memory See thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue, Nor any unproportioned thought his act. Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar. Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel; But do not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each new-hatch'd, unfledged comrade.

Additional Plays

Beware Of entrance to a quarrel, but being in, Bear't that the opposed may beware of thee. Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice; Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment.

Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy; For the apparel oft proclaims the man, And they in France of the best rank and station Are of a most select and generous chief in that. Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.

I have long thought that it is a mistake when directors and actors interpret Polonius as a buffoon. While it will become evident that he is long-winded and filled with a sense of his own importance, and likely well-past his prime as a dispenser of counsel to royalty, the above advice contains real wisdom, but it is wisdom undercut by an unenviable and small-minded philosophy.

Who could really argue with that? By this, he probably means to be sociable with people, but not to debase himself by giving away too many personal details. In other words, be somewhat aloof and not too common.

Again, this sounds like solid advice. Polonius is telling Laertes to recognize who his true friends are, people who have proven themselves, and treasure them. He warns him, however, to be cautious and suspicious about new people who enter his life; they will not necessarily be of the same caliber as his tried and true associates.

Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy; For the apparel oft proclaims the man, And they in France of the best rank and station how he appears. Are of a most select and generous chief in that.Last week’s post on the spooky dimensions of reading—the one-on-one encounter, in the silent places of the mind, with another person’s thinking—sparked a lively discussion on the comments page, and no shortage of interesting questions.

One of the points that was brought up repeatedly, though, focused on one of the points that I didn’t address. Mar 13,  · Hamlet is a Tragedy with a capital T (I guess I don't have to point that out, since you can see clearly in the text that the T was capitalized).

By Tragedy, I mean virtually everyone dies at the end. Get free homework help on William Shakespeare's Hamlet: play summary, scene summary and analysis and original text, quotes, essays, character analysis, and filmography courtesy of CliffsNotes.

William Shakespeare's Hamlet follows the young prince Hamlet . Get free homework help on William Shakespeare's Hamlet: play summary, scene summary and analysis and original text, quotes, essays, character analysis, and filmography courtesy of CliffsNotes.

William Shakespeare's Hamlet follows the young prince Hamlet home to . Act I. The play opens amidst thunder and lightning, and the Three Witches decide that their next meeting shall be with Macbeth.

In the following scene, a wounded sergeant reports to King Duncan of Scotland that his generals Macbeth, who is the Thane of Glamis, and Banquo have just defeated the allied forces of Norway and Ireland, who . In Act 1 Scene 2 Claudius gives Hamlet a speech to try and get him to stop bringing up his father, probably fearing that the more the late King was talked about, or remembered, the more likely people were to look into his death.

The theme of Poison, Corruption, Death in Hamlet from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes