How to write a fictional history book

Definition[ edit ] What distinguishes a fictional universe from a simple setting is the level of detail and internal consistency. A fictional universe has an established continuity and internal logic that must be adhered to throughout the work and even across separate works.

How to write a fictional history book

What will the world look like? How different is it from our own? What new and interesting creatures will inhabit it? What will the people be like?

how to write a fictional history book

What about the cities and landscape? Considering these elements is crucial to creating an interesting, engaging and believable world — in any genre, not just fantasy or science fiction.

Simply put, your characters need a place to live, work and play!

2 The way to write a book is to actually write a book. A pen is useful, typing is also good. A pen is useful, typing is also good. Keep putting words on the page. Read Free History Books. PublicBookshelf has history books that cover a wide range of topics from cold war history to history for kids. Read books online free. To better understand a character’s history, or backstory, many fiction writers create entire histories for their characters. When developing a character for a story, determining the character’s personal history first is critical. You must understand where your character comes from, or you’ll never understand what your character wants or why he acts the way he [ ].

Every one of your favorite books, movies and TV shows involves building a world, even if it looks a lot like our own. Part of what makes a story work so well is its world.

In many ways, the world you build for your tale will be a character in itself: How does worldbuilding improve my writing?

how to write a fictional history book

Taking this level of care with your worldbuilding will carry into your writing and make your story more believable. Consider all aspects of your world Go beyond just outlining the setting your characters live and work in.

The Harry Potter books are a great example: Rowling created an entire magical world, set within our own, each with its own government and laws.

She pulled elements from classic mythology, such as a phoenix and centaurs, and invented myths of her own, like the story of the Elder Wand. Crucially, muggle technology, like electricitydoes not work properly in magical environments. Worldbuilding, step by step Struggling to create a world for your characters?

Try some of these strategies: Take note of how the writer shows, rather than tells, elements of her world. Watch and analyze movies. What did the moviemakers do to make the world come alive? Pay attention to the details that add life and depth to the story.

5 Fictional Stories You Were Taught in History Class | rutadeltambor.com

Take two ideas from different places, put them together and add your own twist to create a whole new world.

Add more detail to flesh it out. Think about the history of the world. What kinds of people live there?Read Free History Books. PublicBookshelf has history books that cover a wide range of topics from cold war history to history for kids.

Why do I need to build a world?

Read books online free. the act of feigning, inventing, or imagining. an imaginary thing or event, postulated for the purposes of argument or explanation. Law. an allegation that a fact exists that is known not to exist, made by authority of law to bring a case within the operation of a rule of law.

Article. Seven Rules for Writing Historical Fiction By Elizabeth Crook Author of The Night Journal: A Novel. We grow up being told to “write” what we “know”, but history is the rutadeltambor.com have to learn almost everything about a period and the social customs just to get your characters out of their beds, (or off of their skins,) and feed them breakfast.

Q: Is it OK to write a fictional story about a historical character like Paul Revere or John Hancock?

How to Write Historical Fiction

—CharlesA: The answer to that question is the same. Go beyond just outlining the setting your characters live and work in. Think about the laws that govern the world, the way the government works, the world’s history, geography, technology and mythology.

The Harry Potter books are a great example: J.K. Rowling created an entire magical world, set within our own, each with its own government and laws. She pulled elements from classic mythology, such as a .

rutadeltambor.com: How to Write History that People Want to Read (): Ann Curthoys, Ann McGrath: Books.

How to Write a Good Fiction Book (with Examples) - wikiHow